Bible of British Taste
  • The Next Big Thing
  • October23rd

    13 Comments

    I photographed my friend Julia de Pauley’s house here  a couple of years ago. It changes all the time. She was designing some belts under her pseudonym, ‘shophound’ but her perfectionism meant that things were never finished. There again in September and October,  I took some more pictures. Here they are.

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    A trio of John de Pauley’s small stone sculptures on the hearthstone.

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    Equine plaster by John de Pauley.

    The sitting room doubling up as a leather finishing workshop.

    The sitting room doubling up as a leather finishing workshop.

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    Tablescape in the corner of the sitting room, something like one of David Hicks’s but less knowing.

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    John de Pauley’s small cast metal sculpture.

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    Inside the front door

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    New uses for a silver pepper pot

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    Aidan in the hall, Jim Dandy belt

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    Georgia de Pauley, Bamboo.

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    Guardian horse figurine and horseshoe around the sitting room door lintel

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    Julia’s worksheet

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    The dining room with sheets drying

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    and an old wooden tea caddy bought that morning at Bridport market

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    Julia, drying linen and their dog Rocky, a handsome old Pointer cross who died on September 21st, after a slow sad decline.

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    Kitchen cupboard, Greek Key design cups by Susie Cooper for Wedgwood.

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    Tea ceremony. Julia likes gold cups, I think most of hers are by Royal Worcester. I covert the peculiar but charming Staffordshire dog milk jug.

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    Charlie McCormick, florist, gardener and dealer in antiques, did the kind favour of standing in as model at the Old Parsonage, in shooting trews, old Harris tweed and his ‘Jim Dandy.’

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    Archaeological lion belt.

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    Julia has been working on these things ever since I’ve known her.  They are part of her very exquisite aesthetic, intrinsic to the way that she lives.   rapsondepauley.com

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    All photos copyright Julia de Pauley and bibleofbritishtaste.com

    Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to bibleofbritishtaste, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

    NEXT WEEK: Domenica More Gordon, a maker and her family home in Scotland.

  • June6th

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    At Unit 1, Cremer Business Centre, 37 Cremer Street http://architecturediary.org/london/events/4970 there’s a peepshow that you can visit for the RIBA London Open Studios / London Festival of Architecture this weekend.

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    Peepholes set at intervals up and down this long wall tiled with paper will give you glimpses  – tiny vignettes of designs photographs and artefacts linked to projects that Adam Richards Architects is currently working on.

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    One is for Simon Costin, whose Museum of British Folkore used to travel the country in a caravan. Now the caravan is up on blocks and the museum is parked on the web : Museum of British Folklore . It works well there but Simon and Adam Richards have been drawing up designs for a more permanent home, of which more below.  You may remember this giant optician’s sign which belongs to Simon, last on show as part of the apparatus of the life of Barbara Jones, whose keen eye was celebrated in the Whitechapel Art Gallery’s exhibition Black Eyes and Lemonade.

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    Behind peephole number 29 you will see ‘A short film of English Dance’ (the Morris).

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    Model of London House currently under construction, seen through peephole.

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    Interior View of Proposed Phase 2 of London apartment, seen through peephole.

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    Punch puppet from the Museum of British Folklore, seen through peephole no 31.

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    Adam Richards won the competition to design Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft in 2008, and the museum reopened in their new and part rebuilt old buildings a year ago.The artist and sculptor Eric Gill moved to Ditchling in Sussex with his family in 1907 and established an artists colony there. Printer Hilary Pepler  soon followed, writing to the calligrapher Edward Johnston who was one of Gill’s pupils, ‘Can you think of any work I can do in Ditchling? We want an excuse to follow the prophet (you) into the wilderness.’ The museum continues to use a customised version of Gill’s typefaces, seen here on the title page of the illustrated book describing the commission for Ditchling, just published by Adam Richards Architects.

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    The new museum building is both shrine and wunderkammer. Exhibits in this anteroom introduce the collection, the village and its history. Adam Richards Architects designed the exhibition spaces too with Ditchling Museum’s then director Hilary Williams .

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    John Piper’s photograph of the Nave floor in Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, is set opposite a photograph of the old village Cart Lodge at Ditchling, now the entrance hall to the new museum with a new slate floor.

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    The new main building is clad with black zinc,  the ghost of agricultural buildings that once occupied this site.

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    Eric Gill’s typefaces.

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    Adam Richards.

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    A detail of the drawing for a proposed Museum of British Folklore, with pylons and Maypole dancers in a glade. Simon Costin’s red caravan that toured the original museum around the country marks the compass points. Adam Richards says : This is the design we produced for Simon Costin. There’s no site for the museum yet, so this is kind of ideal museum.’

     

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    This museum will be a living, contemporary, cultural thing. It might have different buildings for different seasons and in its central courtyard there is a wood. Its elements are drawn from fortified architecture and ancient hill forts, C18th designs for ideal buildings and cities, the rational and the phantasmagorical, surrounded by a landscape of pylons, wasteland and fields.

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    Hurry hurry, the exhibition is open for just 2 days this weekend.

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    You can buy the beautiful book there, too. Adam Richard Architects  www.adamrichards.co.uk

     

    All photographs copyright Adam Richards Architects 2015 and bibleofbritishtaste.com

    For Simon Costin’s folkish 2012 Vogue photoshoot on biblefobritishtaste click here.
    Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Adam Richards Architects and bibleofbritishtaste, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • October30th

    6 Comments

    My friends Bridie Hall and Ben Pentreath are a decorative artist and an architect, both designers and interior designers who also keep an excellent shop, Pentreath and Hall. This week we are doing something together. It’s called London : A Cabinet of Curiosities, at 17 Rugby Street London WC1.

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    Royal Doulton policeman, Houses of Parliament [H.P.] Sauce, framed letterhead by the late great Barbara Jones.

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    Flanked by Bridie’s vitrines holding mud larking finds from the River Thames dating from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.  Hanging above is one of Bridie’s decoupage ‘View of London, 1845,’  plates.

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    The window with Bridie’s Tortoise House, a Palladian design after Sir Thomas Archer made by Ed Kluz. and Ben’s Dr Johnson memorial tea towel which simply says : ‘When a Man is Tired of London he is Tired of Life.’

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    ‘London Landmark’ cushions, made up  in an edition of only 10.

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    One of  Alice Patullo's Bawden-esque limited edition print series for the London Cabinet : three London Drinking Fountains. The 'Readymoney' fountain was erected by Coswasji Jehangir Readymoney in Regent's Park in 1869, a wealthy Parsi philanthropist whose family had made a fortune in the opium trade with China. Decorated with lotus flower finials and a Brahmin bull, it still refreshes joggers, walkers and their dogs with clean London tap water.

    One of Alice Patullo’s Bawden-esque limited edition print series for the London Cabinet : three London Drinking Fountains. The ‘Readymoney’ fountain was erected by Coswasji Jehangir Readymoney in Regent’s Park in 1869, a wealthy Parsi philanthropist whose family had made a fortune in the opium trade with China. Decorated with lotus flower finials and a Brahmin bull, it still refreshes joggers, walkers and their dogs with clean London tap water; dogs drink the overflow water from little marble basins at its base.

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    Fresh water drinking fountains like this were a welcome gift after London’s cholera epidemic of 1854. The gothick granite fountain (above ) on South End Green in Hampstead was donated by a Miss Crump, part of a useful ensemble with public lavatories and a shelter for tramwaymen. The Finsbury Square fountain was the gift of Thomas and Walter Smith in memory of their mother Martha, for the Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association – beasts of burden, cab and dray horses were also catered for by the kindly Victorians.

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    ‘London Street Cries, ‘  from eighteenth century prints of street hawkers, “Rabbets,’ ‘Old Cloaths,’ ‘Singing Birds’ etc. and Thames map mugs, both designed by Matilda Moreton and made in Stoke on Trent especially for the London Cabinet at Penteath and Hall.

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    Vintage London pillar box money boxes from sixty years of the General Post Office and Her Majesty’s Royal Mail, with a pre-Boris double decker tin bus.

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    ‘The Hounds of Spring,’ Regent’s Park, London,2013,  one of three signed photographic prints in an edition of 15, by Liz Neville/ bibleofbritishtaste.

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    Wedgwood mugs – Shakespeare’s theatre and the London to Bristol Road, with some of our many antiquarian books and maps.

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    An entry from In Camden Town by David Thompson, (1983) now scarce and out of print. Thomson was a modern Mayhew who produced this anecdotal and highly personal diary-cum-history spanning thirty years  of Camden Town life and lowlife, the harvest of years of research towards a  vast, sprawling history of Camden Town that was never finished.

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    London is the clearing house of the world, a huge emporium of commodities and money, beautiful, ostentatious luxury and empty churches, migrants, rent boys in little vests and city boys in Turnball and Asser, green, Georgian squares, sooty plane trees, too many bicycles, taxi drivers who’ve had Tracey Emin in the back of their cab and white vans, gunned along by men whose grandparents spoke proper cockney. Boris Johnson, William Blake and William Hogarth are its guides and geniuses. It is an aggregation of marvels and fascinations, unexpected loveliness, dereliction and despoilation, with a river running through it.

    London, A Cabinet of Curiosities is at Pentreath and Hall / www.benpentreath.com, for two more weeks only. Hurry.

    London_Decoupage_Tray

    POSTSCRIPT : More London news – from the 8th to the 28th of November Sir Jonathan’s Miller’s assemblages and Constructivist-inspired collages and sculptures are on show at the Cross Street Gallery, 20 Cross Street, Islington, London N1 2BA.

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    Bronze relief sculpture with the artist’s hand, 2012.

    You saw them first, in his house and studio, in the bibleofbritishtaste.

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    Jonathan Miller, Portrait of the Artist At Home, 2012 (homage to René Magritte)